Close

July 9, 2021

Childhood Trauma Symptoms, Causes, and Interventions

I was exhilarated by the new realization that I could change the character of my life by changing my beliefs. I was instantly energized because I realized that there was a science-based path that would take me from my job as a perennial “victim” to my new job as “co-creator” of my destiny.

From the Prologue of “The Biology of Belief” by Bruce H. Lipton Ph.D Tweet

These words are inspirational and give me hope and faith that the long-standing belief that abuse runs through generations and is perpetuated because of genetics, is false.

By learning new neurological pathways which lead to positive action, nutrition, socializing, and exercising, we can recreate our destinies and help others to do the same. This includes voicing concerns about ideas and actions that may be widely accepted, but propagate, sadness and destruction.

This is a revolutionary time of movement and change. Growing pains are abundant, but the finished product of our struggles will be beautiful.

young boy with troubled eyes

And this brings me to Childhood Abuse and Trauma. It is a topic dear to my heart. As we learn to adapt to our environment, we establish neurological pathways which may become embedded into our behavior for years to come.


Children often do this when they are not given love or are physically or emotionally abused. They may resort to acting out behaviors.

Dopamine formula with person

As they grow older, their natural needs for Love, Attention and Affection (dopamine triggers) are replaced by other behaviors which may not be so healthy for them. Those may include excessive movement, inattentiveness, thrill seeking, drugs, alcohol, deep depression, suicidal tendencies or inability to make decisions. The active behaviors trigger dopamine which they are craving. The inactive ones are ways to mask their needs, deny their true selves and perhaps disappear.

As a life coach, my role is to identify the source of the trauma, the way the client is perceiving it and reacting to it, and to help the child or adult to become aware of their feelings and to move toward neuro-pathways which are healthy and satisfying.

Within the coaching model, all aspects of the person are woven into an integrative whole, bringing the individual to wholeness. Yoga, both Yin and Yang,  nutrition, meditation, mindfulness, stress reduction, focus exercises, neurological pathway interventions and other creative and individually based activities to help children and adults who are going through trauma.

Here is a platform to voice your concerns and ask questions and get answers: All questions are valid and there is no judgement or criticism here.

In the book, The Body Keeps the Score, Bessel Van Der Kolk, M.D. explores how childhood abuse and/or trauma stays in the body and becomes part of the way that the body functions, leading to health and psychological issues throughout life.

Not being seen, not being known, and having nowhere to turn to feel safe is devastating at any age, but it is particularly destructive for young children, who are still trying to find their place in the world.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

cookies

This
Site Uses
Cookies